EcoPrime™ Food Grade Recycled HDPE Arrives in Southern California

A crane lowers the EcoPrime vessel through the roof of Envision's Chino California plant

A crane lowers the EcoPrime vessel through the roof of Envision’s Chino California plant

Chino, California – Thursday, June 27, 2013

The final stages of equipment installation are underway at Envision Plastics’ Chino, California operation as a large crane lowered the EcoPrime™ vessel through the roof of the building and into its framework.  The EcoPrime™ vessel is the final component required to allow Envision to produce EcoPrime™, FDA approved food grade recycled HDPE resin on the West coast.

EcoPrime™ is approved for direct food contact in many food and beverage applications under demanding conditions of use.  EcoPrime™ is currently used in packaging for liquid yogurt drinks, cereals, deli foods, nutritional products, food take out containers, personal care products, toys and other products.  It can be used in blow molding, thermoforming, compression molding, film extrusion and some injection molding applications.

Debugging of the equipment and pre-production trials will take place in July.  Production of EcoPrime™ should commence in August.  Stay tuned for more developments.

 

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The UK Continues to Outpace the US in Use of Recycled Plastics in Milk Jugs

A NORTH-EAST (UK) plastics firm, which makes the UK’s lightest milk bottle, has achieved another first.

Nampak Plastics, in Consett, County Durham, has trialled the world’s first four pint milk bottle made up of about 30 per cent recycled high density polyethylene plastic (HDPE).

The move comes after the firm, which is working with Closed Loop Recycling, created its 32g Infini bottle that is the lightest and strongest bottle of its type in the UK dairy market, and is being sold in Marks and Spencer, Morrisons and Sainsbury’s.

Nampak bosses say that bottle, which won an industry award for sustainability, will save the dairy business about 25,000 tonnes of material every year.

Eric Collins, Nampak managing director, said: “We wanted to increase the amount of recycled HDPE in our bottles to up to 30 per cent by 2015, but have proved this can be reached well ahead of schedule.

“All of our bottles, including the Infini range, currently contain up to 15 per cent, but moving to 30 per cent is a major step forward for the British milk industry.”

Reprinted from the Northern Echo, May 31, 2013
“Nampak, in Consett, County Durham, works on first four pint bottle made of increased recycled material” by Steven Hugill

Embleton Hall Dairies to use new Inifini Milk Bottle Containing Food Grade Recycled HDPE

Editor’s Note: We ran across this article on Packaging Europe’s website, promoting the use of the Infini® milk bottle made with food grade recycled HDPE.  Food grade recycled HDPE is not currently used in milk bottle packaging in North America although FDA approved recycled HDPE is available in North America exclusively from Envision Plastics.  Our food grade recycled HDPE is marketed under the brand name EcoPrime™ and is suitable for packaging a broad range of food products including water, juices, yogurt drinks, coffee, tea, dairy creamers, cereal, nutritionals, syrups, condiments and many other products. 

Embleton Hall Dairies, based in Wingate, County Durham are launching the new 2 litre infini® HDPE recyclable milk bottle following extensive market research. Designed by Nampak Plastics, one of the UK’s leading plastic milk bottle manufacturers, infini® is the innovative next-generation, eco-friendly bottle.Infini-iPad-version1

Infini® has been designed to be lightweighted by up to 25% across the range without compromising strength, resulting in an initial weight reduction of 13% on the standard 2 litre bottle (33g vs 38g). Research has shown customers love its unique design and retailers love the combination of robustness and its environmental credentials.

When placed in the door of a fridge the handle position makes it easier for the consumer to remove the infini® bottle. The bottles are made of HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) and recycled HDPE (rHDPE). Every infini bottle contains up to 15% rHDPE. This recycled content will increase further in the future with a target of up to 30% by 2015.

HDPE plastic milk bottles are 100% recyclable and the consumer can recycle the infini® bottle in exactly the same way as a standard bottle. Also there is a carbon footprint saving over the standard bottle, resulting in approximately 75% of the research panel expressing their preference for the infini® bottle. The bottle achieved international industry recognition, picking up the top award in the ‘Best Dairy Packaging Innovation’ category at the Dairy Innovation Awards 2012, in addition to the World Packaging Organisation 2013 World Star Award.

Commenting on their change to the bottle, Paul Thompson, director of Embleton Hall Dairies said: “The design of milk poly bottles has remained unchanged since we started back in 1984, so we were very interested when Nampak approached us with a new design, in response to growing customer requests for a more environmentally-friendly form of packaging. That it improves bottle strength and reduces leakage rates is a massive bonus, and the results are good for both our customers and the environment”.

Carl Thorley of Nampak who worked with Embleton commented “Infini® is the result of a four year journey that my colleagues undertook in order to reduce the weight and carbon footprint of the standard milk bottle, but without compromising on its strength. It is ‘better by design’ and is playing an important role in helping the British dairy industry to meet its environmental targets and the support we have received from Embleton shows we are meeting the demands of the market.

More info:
http://www.nampak.com

Use of Recycled HDPE in Milk Bottles Expands in the U.K.

The Co-op invests in new eco milk bottles

11 April 2012

The Co-operative Food has become the first retailer to reduce the tint in all of its own-brand plastic coloured milk bottle tops, making it easier for them to be recycled into new bottles.

The Co-operative sells 202 million bottles of milk every year, and previously, the amount of recycled plastic that can be used to make new clear milk bottles was limited because bottle tops colour the material.

The move will mean that the retailer will potentially increase the recycled content of plastic milk bottles from 10% to 30% – helping to produce an extra 4,500 tonnes of recyclable material every year.

Iain Ferguson, environment manager for The Co-operative Food, said: “Protecting the environment is a key part of The Co-operative’s groundbreaking Ethical Plan, and we are proud to be leading the way with this initiative and that The Co-operative is the first UK retailer to complete this move on all of its own-brand milk bottles.“

Marcus Gover, director of Closed Loop Economy at WRAP, said: “We are pleased to see The Co-operative making this commitment to boost the recyclability of its own-brand milk bottles. WRAP research found that reducing the tint in milk bottle tops is a ‘quick win’ that can help achieve higher recycled content in milk bottles, thereby reducing the use of virgin plastic and ensuring more efficient use of resources, which is good news for the environment.”

Source: The Co-op